Are you a researcher, health professional, or just wanting to learn more about the health impacts of oil & gas drilling?

Check out the Environmental Health Channel – a new tool that provides visual access to health data & the impacts of industry.

In this webinar replay, Ryan Grode and Sarah Roberts from the Environmental Health Project show how the channel can be used to create and share environmental sensing and health data narratives.

This data, shared by affected residents and collected by the Environmental Health Project(EHP), includes physical and psychosocial health symptoms, particulate pollution (PM2.5) air measurements, and personal stories from residents.

This tool displays this data using visualization and exploratory data analysis techniques. This enables researchers, health professionals, and the public to interactively explore and share compelling scientific evidence of local impacts of oil and gas drilling.

How is the health impact data collected?

The data represented on the health channel is shared by affected residents and compiled by the Environmental Health Project(EHP).

The data includes:

  • physical and psychosocial health symptoms
  • particulate pollution (PM2.5) air measurements
  • personal stories from residents.

This tool displays this data using visualization and exploratory data analysis techniques. This enables researchers, health professionals, and the public to interactively explore and share compelling scientific evidence of local impacts of oil and gas drilling.

Ryan Grode

Ryan Grode, is from Northwestern Pennsylvania (Erie, PA), received his Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science from Gannon University. His studies focused on hydrology, toxicology and water/air quality. He previously worked several years for the Erie County Department of Health conducting stream monitoring involving Lake Erie and tributaries leading to Lake Erie in addition to their public health programs and interacting with the public to resolve problems in their area. He also has served as an environmental inspector for Urban Engineers of Erie, PA where he focused on wetland delineations and environmental erosion and sedimentation control designs. His laboratory work there included soils testing, water quality testing and air contaminant testing as well as preparing TRI (Toxic Release Information) and other chemical reports.

Sarah Roberts

Intern at Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project.

Sarah Roberts grew up in the Ozarks, and received her BS in Sociology and Psychology from Portland State University in Portland, OR. She is currently a master’s student at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work.

Sarah is interested in environmental justice, rural mental health, and working with Native American communities. She was inspired to work with rural Appalachian communities by her deep connection to her grandparent’s farm in the region.

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